What Your Belly Fat Says About Your Health

Dietary and nutritional content reviewed by Jasmin Gorostiza, DT, DM, DSS, CFPP.️

what-belly-fat-says-about-you
Studies have found a relationship between your belly fat and your overall health.

The debate over accepted weight and body mass index (BMI) versus a trim tummy continues to sprout up in health-conscious circles. Many doctors are continuing to tout that anyone who maintains a weight within what is considered a normal and “healthy” range will be considered safe from the worst health conditions, this is proving to be different from reality. And that reality is about to shock you. Related Read: Here’s Where To Order Frozen Nutrisystem Food

The greater your amount of stored abdominal fat, the higher your chances of developing or having heart disease, high cholesterol, cancer, or even dying earlier than your peers. To lose weight while you can may improve your chances of enjoying a long life with your family.

… of the 44,000 participating individuals, those with slimmed down middles tended to live longer than their weightier counterparts. 

The United States National Institutes of Health performed a Nurses’ Health Study over a sixteen year period which showed, that of the 44,000 participating individuals, those with slimmed down middles tended to live longer than their weightier counterparts. This proved that weight loss is not just about looking your best; it is also about living longer!

Women with waist circumferences of more than thirty-four inches were almost twice as likely to suffer from heart disease and cancer. This was compared to women with a waist size of twenty-seven inches and occurred in spite of the fact that those with a larger abdomen still fell within the parameters of a normal body size.

This is just too bad for that chart that shows what a “healthy” body weight is. It is a shame that those graphs are not helpful and could be detrimental to your long term health. Fortunately, we now know this while we can still do something about it! Related read: How to lose weight with Nutrisystem

Ideal body weight and an acceptable body mass index (BMI) have proven to have less to do with life expectancy than something as simple as how small your waist is.

Ideal body weight and an acceptable body mass index (BMI) have proven to have less to do with life expectancy than something as simple as how small your waist is. Even if you fall within the range of what is considered normal, it does not mean that you are any healthier and will live any longer than someone with a slightly higher BMI and smaller waistline.

Consider this: as a woman, your midsection is where you store the most fat. We all hate it, but it is true. Higher body fat content will cause a host of unwanted health problems that none of us want. Therefore, we should diet and pare down our waists to achieve optimal results.

It is shocking, but it is quite possible to have what is considered a normal body weight and still have too much fat around your midsection. This is being proven time and time again by research and studies from the best medical institutions in the world.

To further prove that this theory is correct, the Mayo Clinic Proceedings published an article in March of this year that detailed these findings. Additionally, the Archives of Internal Medicine has publicized research that illustrates these very same outcomes.

The result is that they all highly advise you lose weight around your middle before you have any of these problems. Consider abdominal weight loss a preemptive strike against cancer and heart disease. Related read: Diet coupons offer instant discount

Living longer and being able to enjoy your life is what we would all love to experience. The best possible chance we give ourselves is slimming down our midsections.

Living longer and being able to enjoy your life is what we would all love to experience. The best possible chance we give ourselves is slimming down our midsections. A shorter lifespan is simply not worth having a larger waist. While not every woman will enjoy a twenty-seven inch middle, to be as small as possible is much healthier for you in the long run.

Have you measured your waistline lately?

3 thoughts on “What Your Belly Fat Says About Your Health

  1. Your article makes a lot of sense. It’s really not about the weight, it’s about the stored fat in the belly area. And yes, I have that as well. I had always thought that that FAT in my belly area came with age. (But then, of course, it does come with age 🙂 ) The good thing is that I can do something about it now. I’m definitely considering Nutrisystem.

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